ACTON.   ELIZA     - Her rare second book.
The English Bread-Book
FOR DOMESTIC USE, ADAPTED TO FAMILIES OF EVERY GRADE: CONTAINING THE PLAINEST AND MOST MINUTE INSTRUCTIONS TO THE LEARNER; PRACTICAL RECEIPTS FOR MANY VARIETES OF BREAD; WITH NOTICES OF THE PRESENT SYSTEM OF ADULTERATION, AND ITS CONSEQUENCES; AND OF THE IMPROVED BAKING PROCESSES AND INSTITUTIONS ESTABLISHED ABROAD. BY ELIZA ACTON. AUTHOR OF “MODERN COOKERY.” LONDON; LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, LONGMANS & ROBERTS. 1857. All right of translation is reserved.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 8vo. 178 X 115mm. 1fep. Half title illustration of wheat sheaves with text and quote - "In no way, perhaps, is the progress of a nation in civilisation more unequivocally shown, than in the improvement which it realises in the food of the community." [1] (1)vi Preface. (1)viii – xii Contents. (1)2 – 204. (1)2 – 24 Advertisements. 1fep. Bound in original brown cloth with bright gilt design of wheat sheaves and text on cover. The back has a few water stains. The original spine expertly re-laid with the original gilt writing intact, slightly browned. Clean, tight and bright, with even very light age-browning through out. A fine original copy.
- This was the last of Eliza Acton's books. It is not only a collection of bread recipes of all sorts, from household bread to Sally Lunns, but also encompasses Acton's strong opinions about adulterated and processed food. It is also a polemic on unhealthy eating which is still relevant 150 years later. Although she was a firm believer in home baking, she also advocated machine dough; mixed in clean commercial bakeries, compared with the filthy conditions and hard lives of the English bakers of the time; But would she have been quite so pleased, had she foreseen the over-processed, chemically stabilised, glyphosate riddled supermarket breads of today.? The book also has chapters on different flours, yeasts, ovens and baking tips for beginners. Although it created a sensation when it first came out in 1857, unfortunately, as it was published two years before her death in 1859, it was never reprinted, and subsequently is now a rare book .

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11204

Acton.   Eliza     - One of the best written English cookery books.
Modern Cookery
In all its branches; Reduced to a system of easy practice, For the use of private families. In a series of receipts which have been strictly tested, and are given with the most minute exactness. By Eliza Acton. Illustrated with engravings on Steel and numerous Woodcuts. Fourteenth Edition to which are added directions for carving. London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, Paternoster Row. 1853.
8vo. Half Title. Frontispiece. Title Page. Dedication Page. [1] p1. Preface. [viii - xlviii] 8 plates. (plate 1 is the frontispiece) [1] 2-608 plus 18 pages of advertisements. Half tan calf, green cloth boards with tan calf corners and gilt lines. Spine with raised bands and gilt lines, 2 black labels with gilt lettering. Some even browning and a some foxing through-out, overall an OK copy.
- Elizabeth 'Eliza' Acton, an English poet and cook, produced and aimed this cookbook at the domestic reader rather than the professional cook or chef. In it she introduced the now-universal practice of listing the ingredients and suggested cooking times with each recipe. Isabella Beeton's bestselling 'Book of Household Management' of 1861 was closely modeled on it. Elizabeth David rated it one of the best nineteenth century cookery books, and television cook Delia Smith is quoted as having called Acton "the best writer of recipes in the English language". 'Modern Cookery' long survived her, remaining in print until 1914 and available more recently in facsimile reprint. Acton was born April 17th 1799 in Battle, Sussex, the eldest of the five children of Elizabeth Mercer and John Acton, a brewer. The family moved to Suffolk shortly after her birth, and there she was raised. At the age of seventeen she and another woman opened a school for girls in Claydon, near Ipswich, which remained open for four years. Her health was precarious and she spent some time in France where she is rumoured to have had an unhappy love affair. She published her Poems in 1826 after returning home and they enjoyed some small success. She subsequently published some single, longer poems, but it was her 'Modern Cookery' of 1845 that garnered her the widest acclaim. Shortly after its publication she relocated to London, where she worked on her next and final book, 'The English Bread Book' of 1857. Along with recipes and a scholarly history of bread-making, this volume contained Acton's strong opinions about adulterated and processed food. Acton, her health never strong, died in February 13th, 1859, and was buried in Hampstead, North London.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 10911

Acton.   Eliza     - In very bright original condition.
Modern Cookery
FOR PRIVATE FAMILIES BY ELIZA ACTON NEW EDITION LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO. 39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON NEW YORK AND BOMBAY 1897
151 x 172mm. 1 fep. [1] Frontispiece (plate 1) Title page. [1] (1)iv-viii Preface. (1)x Vocabulary of terms. (1)xii-xxvii Table of Contents. [1] (1)xxx-xlii Introductory Chapters. [1] 7p Plates. [1] (1)2-622. (1)624-643 Index. [1] 40p Classified catalogue of general literature published by Longmans, Green & Co. Engravings throughout the text. Clean and crisp original tan cloth covers embossed in red and black. Very slightly bumped corners. Occasional light marking to some margins, otherwise very clean.
- Elizabeth 'Eliza' Acton, an English poet and cook, produced and aimed this book at the domestic reader rather than the professional cook or chef. Elizabeth David rated it one of the best written nineteenth century cookery books. It also has numerous fine illustrations throughout the text. Although it is a rather late edition (the first was printed - 1845) it is none the less a very desirable copy due to the very clean original condition.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11115

Anon.       - The great Diet & Health treatise in verse.
Regimen Sanitatis Salerni:
OR THE SCHOOLE OF SALERNES REGEMENT of HEALTH. Containing, Most Learned and judicious Directions and Instructi-ons, for Preservation, Guide, and Government of MANS LIFE. Dedicated, Unto the late High and Mighty King of England, from that University, and published (by consent of learned Physicians) for a generall good. Reviewed, corrected, and enlarged with a Commentary for the more plain and easie understanding thereof. [two lines] By P.H. Dr, in Physicke, deceased. [one line] Whereunto is annexed, A necessary Discourse of all sorts of Fish, in use among us, with their effects appertaining to the Health of Man. As Also, Now, and never before, is added certain precious and approved Ex-periments for Health, by a Right Honourable, and Noble Personage. [one line] London, printed by B. Alsop, dwelling in Grub-Street near the Upper-Pump, 1649.
183 x 142 mm. 1fep. Title page surrounded by a thick floral border. [1] 2p Epistle Dedicatory. (x)2-206 with occasional marginalia in a fine script. 10p The Table. 207-220 Excellent and approved Receipts, 3p The Table of additional Receipts. [1] 1 fep. The whole text block uniformly browned through out. Pages 14-46 with excellent repairs not affecting the text. Original full dark brown calf with blind tooled lines on the spine and a small dark red calf label with gilt lettering. Inside and out this copy looks its age but not objectionable. A desirable copy in the original state.
- The Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum (from Latin: Salerno Rule of Health) is a medieval didactic poem in hexameter verse written as part of the Medical School of Salerno in the XII - XIII century. Although it is commonly dated around that time, some sources argue that it dates back to 1050. The work, probably dedicated to Robert II Duke of Normandy and pretender to the English throne who was in Salerno in 1099 returning from the First Crusade. The text shows signs of the ‘School of Salerno’ for everything about hygiene, food, diet, herbs and their therapeutic properties. The author is unknown, although some attribute it to a certain Giovanni Da Milano (John of Milan), perhaps a disciple of Constantine the African; the text, however, has undergone several contributions over the centuries. It was also translated into almost all European languages, and reached nearly 40 editions before 1501, many of which were added to, or material taken away from the original version. The first English translation was made by Sir John Harington in 1608 . The first printing, containing 364 verses in Latin, was published in 1480, and annotated and edited by Arnold of Villanova; the book was enormously popular and was held in high regard as a textbook for teaching and the dissemination of medicine. It was used for that purpose until the nineteenth century, when an attempt to make a medically accurate translation was made in 1871 by the American doctor John Ordronaux. The Regimen was very popular because the rhyming verses were easy to remember. It was organized by the six ‘non-naturals’. According to Galen, they are: air, food and drink, sleeping and waking, motion and rest, excretions and retentions, and number six, dreams and the passions of the soul. The original content addressed the humors, the complexions (temperaments), and some diseases. It also contains text on phlebotomy, providing information on bloodletting. An interesting read of a far-reaching text and medieval medical classic that can also lie easily along side early cookery classics and treatises. It was not until the late 18th century that medicinal receipts, usually found at the back of most printed cookery books was fazed out.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11224

ANON.       - Very rare.
Adam's Luxury and Eve's Cookery
OR,THE Kitchen-Garden display’d. In Two Parts. 1. Shewing the best and most approved Methods of raising and bringing to the greatest Perfection, all the Products of the Kitchen-Garden; with a Kalendar shewing the different Products of each Month, and the Business proper to be done in it. 11. Containing a large Collections of Receipts for dressing all Sorts of Kitchen Stuff, so as to afford a great Variety of cheap, healthful, and palata-ble Dishes. To which is Added, The Physical Virtues of every Herb and Root. (a line) Designed for the Use of all who would live Cheap, and pre-serve their Health to old Age ; particularly for Farmers and Tradesmen in the Country, who have but small Pieces of Garden Ground, and are willing to make the most of it. (a line) LONDON: Printedc for R. Dobsley, in Pall-Mall ; and Sold by M. Cooper, at the Globe in Pater-noster Row. (a line) MDCCXLIV.
FIRST AND SOLE EDITION. 1744. 12mo. Inside-cover with the bookplate of Mary Chadsey. 1fep. Half Title with small thin 1” piece torn from outer edge without loss, also with ownership inscription “Elizabeth Wynn 1761”. [1]. Title page. [1]. The Introduction - (1) with woodcut headpiece, vi – xii, with woodcut tailpiece. (1) Top woodcut border and decorated initial letters, 2-211. The garden Kalendar starts on p 81. The second part starts on p 101. (1)213-216. 2feps with ownership inscription “Gwen Thomas her book – 1774. Bound in modern full brown calf with two-tone panels on boards. Spine with raised bands and red label with gilt lettering and lines. Bottom compartment with gilt date – 1744. The first few leaves slightly browned but overall in very good condition.
- An unusual old cookery book. It has interesting information and very good advice on the first 80 pages on growing all items in the Kitchen garden. Then 20 pages of very precise Kalendar [sic] information. The second section of 110 pages has unusually for the time, good and detailed recipes. Not all recipes are purely vegetarian as some require meat stocks. This is an important item of any collection of early English cookery books. It helps explain why COPAC lists no less than nineteen British libraries holding a copy. Only 3 copies in auction in 30 years. One of which came up twice. Bitting p 514; Cagle p 541; MacLean p 3; Oxford p 74.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11201

ANON.       - In the original state.
Domestic Cookery
1st Title page - DOMESTIC COOKERY OR FAMILY RECEIPT BOOK. BY A LADY With a small oblong illustrated Farm scene with a farmer and 2 cows. Under the farm scene is a small sentence - 'Blest are those homes with simple, plenty, crowned'. At the bottom is Derby - THOMAS RICHARDSON & SON. 2nd Title page - THE DOMESTIC COOKERY; A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR HOUSEKEEPERS: TO WHICH IS SUBJOINED, A COLLECTION OF VALUABLE RECEIPTS. BY AN EXPERIENCED COOK AND CONFECTIONER. LONDON: THOMAS RICHARDSON AND SON, 26, PATERNOSTER ROW; 9 CAPEL STREET, DUBLIN: AND DERBY.
130x85mm. 1fep. [1] Provenance on back of frontis in neat script; Mr H. Shulter. Merriot 1827. Frontis-piece with a round illustration of a lady cook holding a big jug in a typical Kitchen scene with a caption underneath – Domestic Cookery. Facing that is an elaborate title page. [1] The 2nd Title page. [1] (1)7-313. p 314-324 Contents. 1fep. No illustrations in-text but nice and clean. The original slightly stained light brown blind stamped cloth cover with Domestic Cookery in gilt on the spine. Internally, tight and bright.
- With gratitude I must thank Uta Schumacher-Voelker for clarifying the bibliographic details of this book. Until she helped me it had been very hard to get any precise information. She informs that this little book has the tendency to fool booksellers and collectors alike, because it closely resembles some of the editions of Mrs. Rundell's New System of Cookery in size and binding-style. Uta then elaborates very precisely that it is the last of four clearly distinguishable editions of the same book. The first edition is actually dated 1847 (Derby: Thomas Richardson and Son) Then follows at least three editions, all undated but with different imprints: #2. Derby: Thomas Richardson and Son, 172 Fleet St., London and 9, Capel St., Dublin [nd]. This imprint was issued before 1857, when the imprint changed to #3. Richardson & Son, 147 Strand; 9, Capel St., Dublin, where, according to records, they had their business only until 1860. #4. My imprint, here with the Paternoster Row address issued between 1861-79, but Uta estimates the date of publishing is closer to 1861 than 1879.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11193

ANON.       - Extremely scarce to rare; one of only three copies found.
Every Family's Cookery Book
OR, PLAIN AND PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR PROPERLY PREPARING, COOKING, AND SERVING-UP ALL SORTS OF PROVISIONS, COMPRISING MEATS, POULTRY, FISH, GAME. AND VEGETABLE FOOD. ALSO, Soups, Gravies, Sauces, Pies, Puddings, Pastry, Sweet Dishes, Sweetmeats, Cakes, Bread, Wines, Ale, Beer, Porter, Pickles, &c., &c., &c. DIRECTIONS OF CARVING. THE CHOOSING AND BUYING OF FISH, FLESH AND FOWL. BY AN EXPERIENCED COOK. WAKEFIELD: WILLIAM NICHOLSON AND SONS. London: S.D. EWINS &Co., 22, Paternoster Row.
FIRST EDITION. n/d circa 1850-64. 8vo 1fep replaced. Engraved frontispieces and Title page. [1] Title page. [1] 1p Introduction. [1] (1)8-405. (1)407-416 Index. 1fep. 10 plates of Carving, butcher's cuts, fish etc. Numerous engravings in-text. Engraved title pages uniformly browned. Slightly dusty throughout. With the original blind stamped and embossed dark green and blue fine cloth covers and spine with black relief and slightly faded gilt. Overall the text block is fine, albeit in a slightly used condition and with a lovely original cover.
- A cookery book with a difference! In the 'Introduction' we learn the book is the work of an Authoress. It is also very well laid out with very good plates that have obviously had more effort than usual applied to their production. The cover is very nice and unusual in its detail and presentation. Not in Bitting, Cagle, Attar, Oxford, Hazlitt. No copies in the B.L. Copac has 2 copies. One at the Guildhall Lib. London with no date, and another copy in Leeds, also with 416 pages, printed in Halifax dated 1864. This copy printed in Wakefield with same page collation, but with no date. A search of World Libraries provided no results. A probable minimum of 2 editions with this being the first. One assumes extreme scarcity to rarity.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11109

Anon.       - Very rare.
The English and FRENCH COOK:
DESCRIBING The best and newest ways of ordering and dres-sing all sorts of Flesh, Fish and Fowl, whe-ther boiled, baked, stewed, roasted, broiled, frigassied, fryed, souc'd, marrinated, or pickl-ed; with their proper Sauces and Garnishes: Together with all manner of the most ap-proved Soops and Potages used, either in England or France. By T.P. J.P. R.C. N.E. And several other approved Cooks of London and Westminster. LONDON: Printed for Simon Miller at the Star, at the West-end of St. Pauls. 1674.
FIRST EDITION. Small thick 12mo. 1fep (rather brittle and loose) Title page a little browned and cracked at edges, without loss. 2pp The Epistle. 1-430. 431-450 Bills of Fare. 14pp The Table. 8pp Book Advertisements. 1fep. Pages 292-309 missing. Original full calf binding without end-papers, exposed on binders cardboard. The binding is torn at the top of spine without loss. Very lightly age browned throughout. Overall a nice but beaten copy with the original binders stitching just holding the gatherings. With a nice patina.
- Oxford states; This must be the book that was denounced in the third edition of (Varenne's English translation) 'The French Cook'. Oxford further states, 'The English and French Cook' appeared in 1694 under the new title 'The Compleat Cook'. Arber states there is a 1690 edition called the 'The Compleat English and French Cook'. The BL and the Bodleian each have one copy dated 1674. Notaker lists in the US the Folger, Harvard & UW Madison. All editions are extremely rare.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11090

ANON.       - 6 Vols. in 3 Tomes.
DOMESTIC ECONOMY.
THE MAGAZINE OF DOMESTIC ECONIMY. VOLUME THE FIRST - FIFTH. (a single thin straight line) WE ARE BOTRN AT HOME, WE LIVE AT HOME, AND WEE MUST DIE AT HOME, SO THAT THE COMFORT AND ECONOMY OF HOME ARE MORE DEEP AND HEART-FELT, AND PERSONAL INTEREST TO US,THAN THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS OF ALL THE NATIONS OF THE WORLD. (a single thin straight line) LONDON: PUBLISHED BY ORR AND SMITH, PATERNOSTER ROW; AND W. & R. CHAMBERS, EDINBURGH. (a single very small thin straight line) MDCCCCXXXVI.
Three thick Volumes. 220 x 147 x 49 mm. 1st VOL: 1st TOME: 1fep. Title page. [1] (1)iv Preface. (1)ii - iii Introduction. 4 - 382. (1)384 - 387 Index. 2nd VOL: [1] Half Title. [1] Title Page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 3rd VOL: 2nd TOME: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 4th VOL: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 5th VOL: 3rd TOME: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. 6th VOL: 1fep. Half-Title [1] Title page. [1] (1)2 - 376. (1)378 - 380. Index. 1fep. All fully bound in dark green embossed silk with light brown label. with gilt text and tooling. Overall all volumes slightly age browned with very slight foxing throughout. A fine set.
- If you look at Item Ref: 11279 on this site, you can see the four volumes of Cassell's company produced books about the 'Household' with no authorship attributed. This is also the case when you peruse these three volumes here published by William S. Orr's publishing house. It's obvious both are typical of a Victorian printed genre aimed at a burgeoning middle-class due to the huge ramp-up of the British industrial revolution. The big difference is that these Orr produced volumes are full of all manner of things that the Victorian husband and wife would need, but without illustrations nor colour plates to enrich the production, whereas the Cassell books are heavily illustrated with chromolithograph colour plates and practical black and white vignettes. The Cassell production was a direct response to the famous O.S. Beeton and Ward Lock publishing phenomenon of Isabella Beeton's 'Household Management'. But Beeton's book itself was a direct response to this type of earlier book here. One of the other big differences besides the gaps in years, between all three household books is that Beeton's is attributed to Isabella and not just a company. William S. Orr was a publishers' agent from the 1830s, and was a close associate of Robert and William Chambers, (the other publisher named in these six volumes). He printed a London edition of 'Chambers's Edinburgh Journal' by mid-1832. The arrangement used stereotype plates, and brought the circulation up to 50,000. He published these volumes of 'Household Economy' in 1936. By 1845 the overall circulation was declining from its peak, and Orr wrote to Chambers explaining that the market was changing. In 1846 Chambers terminated the arrangement with Orr. Punch magazine, set up in 1841, brought in Orr to help with distribution to booksellers and news agents. Orr died in 1873. Whatever the publishing merits or not of these books, they are fascinating pragmatic advice for everything needed to be known about the setting up of a comfortable Victorian home.

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Antiquarian category
ref number: 11280

ANON.       - The names of authors written in ink.
THE ART OF DINING;
or GASTRONOMY AND GASTRONOMERS, (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852. 2nd PART: MUSIC AND THE ART OF DRESS. TWO ESSAYS REPRINTED FORM THE 'QUARTERY REVIEW.' (single fine line) LONDON: JOHN MURRAY, ALBERMARLE STREET. 1852.
FIRST EDITION. 172 X 110 mm. 2FEPS. Title page, with author's name; By A. Hayward QC. Verso: Adverts for John Murray publications. (1)Prefatory Notice. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 128. (1)130 - 137 Appendix. Verso Adverts for John Murray publications. 2nd. PART. Title page, with author's name; By Lady Eastlake. [1] (1) - vi Contents. (1)2 - 112. 2feps. Quarter light tan leather binding with marbled paper and light tan leather tips to boards. Spine with blind and gilt tooling and black and gilt label. All text block edges marbled. An elegant book.
- A hugely fascinating book with articles from at least ten famous (at the time) people: Lords, Lady's, Diplomats, Counts and Editors. The author whose name in ink adorns the top of the title page of the first part seems to be by Abraham Hayward QC. who wrote many articles, letters and reviews. The second author whose name also appears in ink atop the second title page is Lady Elizabeth Eastlake, a 43 year-old in 1852. A reviewer, translator and essayist, who was famously the object of hallucination by the great English painter J.M.W. Turner, on his deathbed. On pages 30/31 there is a very interesting detailed report by a Lady Morgan, (famous Irish author and reviewer) about a dinner cooked by Careme at Baron Rothschild's villa. Before this, on page 29, there are a series of distinctions of the varying professional merits of the two most famous Chefs of the time, and alleged rivals; Careme and Beauvilliers. Careme is viewed as superior on 'invention' and Beauvilliers' more remarkable for 'judgement' but had exhausted the old world of the art, while Careme discovered a new one. On page 73 after a discussion of the great culinary reputations of the current crop of named British Chefs and their placements, it is Louis Eustache Ude whom they place at the top, due to his twenty years educating the palate of the late Earl of Sefton. This is the same Ude who wrote the famous book of cookery titled 'The French Cook', and later the Chef de Cuisine of Crockfords Club in St. James's, Mayfair. Page after page of anecdotes, gossip and essays of the History of Cookery, the Gastronomic effects of the French Revolution, accounts of Paris Restaurants, famous Dinners in England, merits of female and male Cooks etc etc. Of great interest to anyone who wants more detailed information on the great Chefs of that era, and their famous Patrons.

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Information

Antiquarian category
ref number: 11286